Lung Cancer Patients Living Self-Portrait Series: Christine

I wanted to create a living self-portraits series about lung cancer patients and caregivers. These portraits are about our feelings, our journey, especially how we got to this point. I will interview the patients and the caregivers as if I am a brush in their hand. Today, I interviewed myself as the 1st living self-portrait of the series.https://lungcancer.net/living/self-portrait-series-christine/

斐-8My friend HaoPei (斐皓) is a Stage 4 lung cancer patient, 37 years old. This picture was taken by him when he traveled in rural China after his diagnosis.

How Should I Talk About My Lung Cancer?

I’m not a social person but it doesn’t bother me. When I was diagnosed with lung cancer, I became even more isolated. One reason is that I didn’t know how to talk to people about my cancer. Later, I also noticed that my colleagues didn’t know how to talk to me either. How can I talk comfortably with people, especially those don’t have cancer?https://lungcancer.net/living/talking-about-my-cancer/

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My friend HaoPei (斐皓) is a Stage 4 lung cancer patient, 37 years old. This picture was taken by him when he traveled in rural China after his diagnosis.

What Has Cancer Taught Me: Meaning and Wisdom Follow Suffering

After diagnosing lung cancer, I understad what suffering means. Slowly, little by little, I digested and absorbed the suffering. I understand “… suffering is like a pathway towards meaning and wisdom. Without suffering, I wouldn’t have realized and appreciated the meaning of life.” It’s absolutey important to allow yourself to reflect and grieve. https://lungcancer.net/living/meaning-follows-suffering/

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My friend HaoPei (斐皓) is a Stage 4 lung cancer patient, 37 years old. This picture was taken by him when he traveled in rural China after his diagnosis.

A Surprise from International Lung Cancer Survivorship Conference

I attended LUNGevity’s International Lung Cancer Survivorship Conference(ILCSC) in Washington DC from April 25-28, 2019. It was the first time I attended a conference specifically for lung cancer patients and caregivers. It was such a surprising conference from many perspectives — conference content, social arrangement, and especially the conference atmosphere. https://lungcancer.net/living/international-survivorship-conference/

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My friend HaoPei (斐皓) is a Stage 4 lung cancer patient, 37 years old. This picture was taken by him when he traveled in rural China after his diagnosis.

To Donate or Not To Donate: American vs. Chinese Views

It’s quite a routine for North Americans to donate to charities, but not for Chinese. According to “30 Years of Giving in Canada” published in 2018, levels giving to charities as a percentage to GDP are: US (1.44%) ranked 1st, Canada (0.77%) ranked 3rd, and China (0.03%) ranked 23rd out of 24 countries.1 Living in China and later in Canada for my entire life and contributing to raising funds for US ROS1+ Lung Cancer research, I noticed that Chinese and North Americans have totally different viewpoints on donation…. https://lungcancer.net/living/to-donate-or-not/

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My friend HaoPei (斐皓) is a Stage 4 lung cancer patient, 37 years old. This picture was taken by him when he traveled in rural China after his diagnosis.

Don’t Give Up!

It was unimaginable to travel with my situation, a stage IV lung cancer metastasis to the brain. Nowadays, it’s not a big deal. Last September, I attended the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Conference (IASLC/WCLC2018) in Toronto, Canada. It was a 2.5 hours flight from Winnipeg, Canada. This March, I went to Las Vegas (a 3 hour flight), and in April, I will go to the Hope Conference in Washington D.C. For me, still being able to travel means a lot. It means I still can handle normal life. On the way to Las Vegas, I could not help to recall my 15 day stay in the hospital when I was first diagnosed. See from https://lungcancer.net/living/dont-give-up/

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My friend HaoPei (斐皓) is a Stage 4 lung cancer patient, 37 years old. This picture was taken by him when he traveled in rural China after his diagnosis.