The Advocate I Want to Be

After trying my hand at all things advocacy, it’s time I narrow down and focus on the lung cancer advocacy involvement. https://lungcancer.net/living/advocate-aspiration

My friend HaoPei (斐皓) was a Stage 4 lung cancer patient, 38 years old. He passed away in early February 2020. These pictures were taken by him when he travelled in rural China after his diagnosis. 斐皓, 一路走好。

Singing Is Good for Lung Cancer Patients’ Mental Health

People love to sing, even if they can’t sing melodiously. It’s believed that singing is good for the body and mind, and as a matter of fact, there’s solid scientific evidence to prove it. My parents, age 85 and 86, and I sing every day through the phone during the pandemic. I can honestly say that singing improves the mood and develops a sense of belonging and connection for my parents and myself.

Photo from Lifebook online, Jon & Missy Butcher (https://home.mindvalley.com/quests/en/lifebook-online)

Refection on Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games opened on July 23, 2021. I become very emotional about the Olympic Games this year because, precisely at the last Olympic Game in 2016, I made a secret plea against “wisdom” at the time. See details in https://lungcancer.net/living/2020-olympics-refection

My friend HaoPei (斐皓) was a Stage 4 lung cancer patient, 38 years old. He passed away in early February 2020. These pictures were taken by him when he travelled in rural China after his diagnosis. 斐皓, 一路走好。

Patients Can Raise Big Voice!

I always have doubts about political advocacy. I wonder if it’s useful? Will politicians listen to the patients’ concerns? Are there any consequences for the cancer patients? Meanwhile, I’m fascinated by political advocacy. For the first time, I did political advocacy with several patients to urge the provincial government to allow cancer patients and immunocompromised patients to have the 2nd dose vaccine before the four months interval. As a result, the government did change the policy. I’m ecstatic. Please see the article below: https://lungcancer.net/living/raise-patient-voices

My friend HaoPei (斐皓) was a Stage 4 lung cancer patient, 38 years old. He passed away in early February 2020. These pictures were taken by him when he travelled in rural China after his diagnosis. 斐皓, 一路走好。

Lung Cancer Patients Living Self-Portrait Series: Chinese ROS1+ Group

I’m surprised to read this article that I wrote in 2019 and re-posted by lungcancer.net now. My friend, 裴皓, passed away one year before. I was closely following him then and had communicated with him several times after this interview. Religion in China used to be forbidden, but he was open about the effects of religion on his coping with lung cancer. He kept travelling to so many rural places until… He took numerous pictures as you will see in this blog. He left a deep impression on me. Please see  https://lungcancer.net/living/living-self-portrait-ros1

My friend HaoPei (斐皓) was a Stage 4 lung cancer patient, 38 years old. He passed away in early February 2020. These pictures were taken by him when he travelled in rural China after his diagnosis. 斐皓, 一路走好。

What Should A Lung Cancer Patient Look Like?

I understand everybody is unique and lung cancer patients are not exceptional, but I refuse to let cancer drag me down. I learnt to laugh instead of depressed and fear, to move forward in spite of losing friends due to this horrible disease, to face the challenges with my head lifting high… At least for some lung cancer patients, we have a life, a better life, to live although we constantly fight for invisible battles.  https://lungcancer.net/living/invisible-battles

My friend HaoPei (斐皓) was a Stage 4 lung cancer patient, 38 years old. He passed away in early February 2020. These pictures were taken by him when he travelled in rural China after his diagnosis. 斐皓, 一路走好。

Positive Effects of Teachers

I wrote my experience with the worst teacher I have ever met in the previous article [1], but at the same time, I had numerous excellent teachers that I thought about them often. Among them, Mrs. W, taught me Chinese literature when I was in middle school, and Mr. S taught me math when I was in high school and had lifetime influences on me.

Observation, Observation and Observation

Mrs. W taught me Chinese literature. One of the main parts of Chinese literature is to learn composition. When Mrs. W taught about composition, the first day, she talked a lot about Observation with my own eyes. It’s eye-opening for me. 

I was 14 at the time, and before that, I was taught to thinking according to what the Chinese Communist Party and people around me wanted, and never thought by myself. I never observed anything through my own eyes. I believe that the majority of Chinese were like that at the time. Mrs. W also announced that she would give a large portion of the term mark based on our improvement for Observation. 

It was such fun to take Mrs. W’s course and saw the world with my own eyes. Then, for the first time, I felt the freedom of writing anything I desired, and I remembered to tell myself that I could be a writer for the rest of my life. That was the first time I dreamed without a haze to be a writer. But, unfortunately, both my parents were scientists, and under the Chinese Communist Party, many good writers had miserable lives. So I was trained to be a scientist, and my dream to be a writer was soon shattered.

Although I didn’t become a writer, I learnt three attributes to be a good writer: 1) sensitivity to what happens around us, 2) having the guts to tell the truth to evoke people, 3) mastering the language. I have the first two attributes, but sadly, I’m not good at the languages, either Chinese or English. 

I have written articles regularly since three years ago, have them reviewed and post on the Health Union (lungcancer.net) as a lung cancer patient advocate [2]. From time to time, the articles resonated with patients and had a lot of comments as feedbacks. I saw first-hand the power of writers.

Asking smart questions

I went to one of the top three high schools in Beijing, China. Unlike the private schools here, the students passed the “incandescent” entrance exams in China, which was the prelude to the elite universities of my time. So naturally, the students in such high schools were expected top-notch. 

Mr. S was my math teacher in high school. In the beginning, we were pretty arrogant, like “proud sons and daughters of heaven”. However, the arrogance was all gone within a short time, mainly because of Mr. S. I learned the most from Mr. S to “ask smart questions”. 

In Canada, people often say there are no stupid questions, but that’s not true. To ask good questions requires a though understanding of the subjects, and you have to have your opinion further. The success of good research (or anything) lies in defining a good question, which is not easy. I learnt how to ask questions with Mrs. S, and “asking intelligent questions” has been my life-long quest.

Afterthought

I have been an engineering professor for 20 years, but thinking back, did I have such an impact on my students? The teachers from primary schools, middle schools, or high schools are not only teaching the students to read and do math but, more importantly, to build their characters. I like to quote from “TeacherGoal” from FB:

“Engineers make bridges. Artists kame paintings. Scientists make rockets. But teachers make them all.”

Reference

[1] Wu, Q. Christine, How to Forgive, 2021, https://prevailingwithlungcancer.blog/2021/06/27/how-to-forgive/

[2] Wu, Q. Christine, Prevailing with Lung Cancer, 2018, https://prevailingwithlungcancer.blog/

Photo from Lifebook online, Jon & Missy Butcher (https://home.mindvalley.com/quests/en/lifebook-online)

Reflections On My 6th Cancerversary

Why the cancer treatments work for some patients but fail miserably for others? I reflect on my experience on the cancer journey on my 6th cancerversary in June. https://lungcancer.net/living/cancerversary-reflections

My friend HaoPei (斐皓) was a Stage 4 lung cancer patient, 38 years old. He passed away in early February 2020. These pictures were taken by him when he travelled in rural China after his diagnosis. 斐皓, 一路走好。